The administrative draft of the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan is available for review. This version incorporates public input and comments received since the publication of the public draft, including comments received during a virtual Community Meeting on June 29th and the final Planning Team Meeting on August 5th. For additional information, please contact Carlos Guerra, Project Manager for the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan at carlos.guerra2@sanantonio.gov.

To read a PDF of the administrative draft plan, click here.

The administrative draft of the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan is available for review. This version incorporates public input and comments received since the publication of the public draft, including comments received during a virtual Community Meeting on June 29th and the final Planning Team Meeting on August 5th. For additional information, please contact Carlos Guerra, Project Manager for the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan at carlos.guerra2@sanantonio.gov.

To read a PDF of the administrative draft plan, click here.

How To Use This Plan

Plan Purpose

This Plan proposes a medium-term vision, recommendations, and strategies for improving and developing the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center over the next ten years. The Plan is an implementation component of the City of San Antonio’s SA Tomorrow Comprehensive Plan. Adopted in 2016, the Comprehensive Plan is the City’s long-range land use and policy plan that is intended to be a blueprint for future growth and development through the year 2040. The Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan is an implementation-oriented Sub-Area plan that will further develop recommendations from the SA Tomorrow Comprehensive Plan to improve quality of life for San Antonio residents, guide growth and development that accommodates projected housing and employment increases, and to fulfill other Comprehensive Plan goals and policies through a community-based planning process.

The Regional Center Plan honors and integrates previously adopted neighborhood and community plans while providing an equitable path for all neighborhoods to participate in planning, to create priorities, and to advocate for implementing their priorities in the future.

Intent of the Plan

The Port San AntonioArea Regional Center Plan will be the essential tool to guide future development and City investment in the plan area based on the vision and goals for the Port San Antonio Area. A diverse assemblage of stakeholders met for a series of planning team meetings throughout the planning process to make recommendations that support both the policy direction of the Comprehensive Plan as well as the community’s aspirations. This work culminated with achievable recommendations and strategies that will be utilized by City Departments, partner agencies, private entities, and community partners to guide policies and investments that implement appropriate and desired development patterns as well as the creation and support of livable, complete neighborhoods.

How to Use This Plan

The vision for the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center can be realized through implementation of the Plan Framework, with recommendations and strategies related to the following topics: Land Use, Focus Areas and Transformtive Projects, Mobility, Amenities and Public Spaces, Housing, and Economic Development. These recommendations and strategies include policy and regulatory matters, partnerships, and investments. Plan recommendations are written to provide actionable specificity while still allowing the flexibility needed to adapt to unforeseen challenges or opportunities.

Coordination with Adopted Plans

The City of San Antonio adopted a couple plans in recent decades for individual neighborhoods or parts of the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center. Each of these plans is described in the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan. Some specific recommendations from these plans are directly referenced as complementary to achieving this Regional Center's vision and goals. Each of the plans was used as a foundational element for creating the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan. The previously adopted plans include important historical information, policies reflecting the values of participants at the time of their adoption, detailed information and recommendations for specific places and issues such as for a single neighborhood, and topics not addressed by the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan in the realms of social services, law enforcement, and organizational strategies for neighborhood associations and other organizations that created the plans. The following community plans were previously adopted and include portions of land that is within the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center:

  • United Southwest Community Plan
  • Kelly/South San P.U.E.B.L.O. (People Unitied and Empowered to Build Local Opportunities) Community Plan

The Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan was also developed to complement and contribute in particular to the implementation of the following regional and citywide plans:

  • San Antonio’s Housing Policy Framework
  • SA Tomorrow Multi-modal Transportation Plan
  • SA Tomorrow Sustainability Plan
  • SA Corridors Strategic Framework Plan
  • VIA’s Vision 2040 Plan

In implementing the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan, further consideration should be given to the recommendations of emerging and ongoing planning processes, including but not limited to:

  • VIA’s Rapid Transit Corridors planning
  • SA Climate Ready
  • San Antonio’s Housing Policy Framework implementation programs
  • San Antonio Parks System Strategic Plan
  • San Antonio Sidewalk Master Plan
  • ConnectSA

Statutory Requirements

Once adopted by City Council, the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan becomes a component of the City’s SA Tomorrow Comprehensive Plan. Previously adopted neighborhood, community, and sector land use plans that are contained within or partially overlap the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan are identified as a foundational part of the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan. However, where a previous plan and the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan have conflicting land use designations within the adopted boundary of the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan, the Sub-Area Plan will be the plan of reference. Similarly, where a previous plan and the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan have conflicting policies or priorities within the adopted boundary of the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan, the Sub-Area Plan will be City policy.

By virtue of the plan adoption process, all proposed projects must be found to be consistent with the SA Tomorrow Comprehensive Plan, and as such, the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center Plan must be consulted when proposing a public investment or a land use project that requires deviation from current entitlements.

Plan Framework Recommendations

Focus Areas

Strategy #1

Prioritize major amenity and infrastructure improvement projects that support multiple plan recommendations, including those related to mobility, creation of public space, provision of recreation and green spaces, and protection of natural resources.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Prioritize appropriate siting, design, and programming of public places in mixed-use focus areas during planning and development review processes to help create places that are attractive and become destinations.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Amend the Unified Development Code (UDC) to create or update zoning districts, design standards, and design guidelines to provide guidance on transitions between higher intensity development and existing lower intensity development that includes considerations for solar access, shade, privacy, drainage, and other factors.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #4

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Ensure streetscape, sidewalk, and transit infrastructure improvements are undertaken before or during construction of new focus area projects.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Develop and implement multi-modal and transit plans throughout the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center, prioritizing projects in the focus areas and building upon connectivity opportunities to existing routes for public transit and green trails for pedestrians and bicyclists.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Assess and recommend changes to the existing Major Thoroughfare Plan, street standards and development recommendations to shift focus from automobile-oriented requirements to multi-modal oriented standards that prioritize pedestrian, bicycle, and other non-automobile traffic.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Mobility

Strategy #1

"Continue evaluating and incorporating proven strategies and best practices into future improvement projects to help with traffic calming and creating Complete Streets. This will improve pedestrian, bicycle, and traffic safety within the Regional Center and help achieve San Antonio’s Vision Zero goals. The highest priority ares are identified as Severe Pedestrian Injury Areas (SPIAs):
  • Old Pearsall Road from Loop 410 to War Cloud Street (from 2011-2015 SPIA analysis)
  • Cupples Road from Menefee Boulevard to Kirk Place (from 2014-2018 SPIA analysis)
Figure # shows SPIA priority areas based on data from the 2018 San Antonio Severe Pedestrian Injury Areas Report (pages 33-34). Additional analysis of pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicle crash data and community input, also identified the following as priorities:
  • US 90 and West Military Drive;
  • Loop 410 and Valley Hi Drive;
  • Loop 410 and Medina Base Road;
  • Old Pearsall Road and Five Palms Drive; and
  • Old Pearsall Road and Excellence Drive.
A graphic of the intersection of Cupples Road and Darby Boulevard, which is located within the segment of Cupples that is identified as a high priority area, illustrates possible improvements that could be made along Cupples Road to improve safety for pedestrians such as more prominent intersection crossings, wider sidewalks, changing the lane configuration, and identifying dedicated bike lanes. See Figure X."
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

"Based on input from the community regarding the need to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety, and the potential for future development that could increase land use intensity, invest in well-designed crossings that incorporate best practices for safety and placemaking at the intersections of:
  • Cupples Road and Thompson Place;
  • Old Pearsall Road and Medina Base Road; and
  • Springvale Drive from US 90 to Medina Base Park.
"
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Conduct a Complete Streets study to find opportunities to reduce pedestrian crossing time, increase pedestrian crossing opportunities, and reduce operational speeds. The following street segments are ideal for study and implementation:
  • Old Pearsall Road from Five Palms Drive to West Military Drive;
  • Valley Hi Drive from Ray Ellison Boulevard to Springvale Drive;
  • SW 36th Street from US 90 to West Thompson Place; and
  • General McMullen Drive from US 90 to Roselawn Road.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Implement on-road infrastructure and wayfinding projects to improve first/last mile connectivity to regionally significant trailheads such as the Pearsall Park and the Levi Strauss trailheads.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Evaluate street and intersection design for transit reliability chokepoints, like at-grade railroad crossings or vehicular traffic areas, and prioritize multimodal investments to ensure reliable alternatives to vehicular travel. Targeted interventions that could impact transit service reliability include:
  • Railroad crossing of Zarzamora Street and Frio City Road; and
  • US 90 westbound frontage roads at Kel-Lac Transit Center.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Update street design standards to be consistent with SA Tomorrow goals for safety, economic growth, development, and city form and to reflect the relationship between the built environment and the streetscape. Street design standards should consider all levels of interactions with the street including pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists. Near term priorities identified in the SA Tomorrow Multimodal Plan of design standard adjustments include:
  • Encourage walkability through context senstive design treatments like minimum sidewalk widths of 6 to 8 feet with 6 foot buffer on main arterials for higher density residential areas, 10 feet for downtown and in locations designated for transit oriented development
  • Allow midblock crosswalks with required safety features at locations with high pedestrian demand along roadways with high traffic volumes and long crossing distances; and
  • Encourage cycling through design with treatments such as barrier separated facilities on arterials where posted speed limits are above 35 mph.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Implement first/last mile strategies, such as sidewalks, curb ramps, crosswalks, bicycle facilities, etc., at VIA Metropolitan Transit transfer areas, Primo station areas, and future Advanced Rapid Transit Corridor station areas. This promotes access to transit by creating inviting, quality public space at stations where large numbers of people benefit from amenities like shade, seating, and safety lighting, as well as placemaking initiatives. Investments focused in station areas should consider the implementation timeline and prioritize areas of both Advanced Rapid Transit and fixed-route services serving the following locations:
  • West Military Drive and Whitewood Street
  • West Military Drive and Five Palms Drive
  • West Military Drive and Selfridge Boulevard
  • West Military Drive and Luke Boulevard
  • Kel-Lac Transit Center
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

When VIA Advanced Rapid Transit Corridor Stations are designated, studies should be completed to determine the application of TOD zoning, and future developments in these station areas will require consistency with the VIA’s guidelines for station typologies and the following principles:
  • Density - Increased neighborhood amenities and destinations near stations and stops influence the type of transit services offered in an area. Transit frequency is directly dependent on density – the more people and jobs within an area, the more transit frequency is justified.
  • Design - Buildings designed for the pedestrian; placed and oriented along the front of the street with parking on-street, placed behind or structured, and with direct access to first floor building activities are vital components of transit-supportive design.
  • Mix of Uses - Providing a mix of residential, employment, and retail uses within walking distance of a transit stop or transit station is beneficial to the community and make walking and riding transit more efficient choices for meeting daily needs.
  • Walkability - Pleasantly designed, walkable places are attractive areas where people desire to travel on foot or by mobility device. Active streets that have development that is continuous along many blocks encourages economic activity. Investments to improve the pedestrian realm include streetscape enhancements in public spaces, such as continuous level surfaces, street furniture, lighting, landscaping, and shading devices, where applicable.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Amenities and Public Space

Strategy #1

Work with property owners and agencies to dedicate portions of W Military Drive, Medina Base Road, and SW 36th Street to establish future trail connections. Include these trail connectivity opportunities in the City’s Greenway Trails System to encourage connection of existing and future trails to parks within and beyond the Regional Center boundaries.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

  • CWork with property owners and agencies to acquire or dedicate segments of the abandoned railroad spur/easement that is located east of Apple Valley Road from Medina Base Road to Old Pearsall Road so that a future linear park can be developed, providing a new connection from Medina Base Park to Millers Pond Park. Incorporate design improvements that integrate low-impact development techniques while also promoting physical activity and beautification of the underutilized space.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Incorporate street trees when reconstructing sidewalks, curbs, and gutters in mixed-use corridors and focus areas. In San Antonio’s climate, shade is important for making walking a comfortable and viable transportation option.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #4

Evaluate and amend the Unified Development Code (UDC), if needed, to grant developers credit towards tree maintenance and landscaping requirements for planting and successfully maintaining street trees that are large enough to shade sidewalks.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Integrate public art, monument signage and landscaping in new thoroughfare designs and future roadway improvement projects with a consistent theme that compliments existing public art that is unique to Port San Antonio.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Update street design standards to improve pedestrian environment requirements, art, and identity features along major thoroughfares, focus area, and mixed-use corridors.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Establish requirements and/or incentives for private development to include public art and landscaping that is visible from the public rights-of-way and publicly accessible open space.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #4

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Identify new plaza locations, particularly in the focus areas where there will be a diverse mix of uses, transit service, and density that will support and use the plazas at different times of the day. Sites for the new plazas should also connect to nearby parks to increase activity to and from the plazas. For example, the focus area off Old Pearsall Road should establish new plazas and create a trail or trails that provide access to Pearsall Park.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Evaluate the use of existing parks, such as Kennedy Park, Millers Pond Park, and Medina Base Park, and determine ways to reprogram the existing park spaces to serve the population, including integrating public plazas into the design of the existing park space to increase use of the parks for different activities.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #4

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #5

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Amenities and Infrastructure

Strategy #1

Add or enhance pedestrian crossings along major thoroughfares throughout the Port San Antonio Area. Crossings for SW 36th Street, General McMullen, Cupples Road, Billy Mitchell Blvd, Medina Base Road, and Old Pearsall road should be prioritized for there is currently a significant amount of pedestrian activity that will likely continue to increase along these roadways. Crossings in close proximity to schools, libraries, parks and trails should also be prioritized due to higher pedestrian activity to and from these community assets.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Reduce the impact of the freeway overpasses at General McMullen, SW 36th Street, and W Military Drive by incorporating better lighting, art, public spaces and other means of activating what are typically dark and uninviting spaces in such a way that it contributes to the character of the community and provides a safer pedestrian environment that is also more welcoming.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #4

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #5

  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Land Use

Strategy #1

In existing neighborhoods, require future redevelopment and changes in property uses to complement existing residences, in terms of density, heights and setbacks.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Review current property zoning to ensure that zoning within existing, established neighborhoods is consistent with the adopted land use. Protect the integrity of existing, established neighborhoods by ensuring that properties in those neighborhoods are zoned for residential use, at a scale that is consistent with neighboring uses, and rezone where there are inconsistencies between zoning and the future land use designation.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Do not waive current requirements for sidewalks during the platting stage for future development, and encourage pedestrian connectivity and parkland dedication in the areas near existing neighborhoods when possible.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Rezone properties in mixed-use corridors to ensure that entitlements align with the vision expressed in the future land use plan. A mixture of uses along these corridors should include commercial, employment, service-oriented uses, and residential.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Allow lower density mixed-use and commercial development in areas that primarily service neighborhoods, and higher density mixed-use and commercial development along highways and major thoroughfares.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Rezone properties in focus areas to a mixed-use zoning district where possible. This could include the Transit-Oriented Development District, Form Based Zoning Development District, or Mixed-Use District. Planned Unit Development Districts should incorporate base zoning districts at higher density levels and should include multiple base zoning districts in the project, to encourage a range of residential types and/or a mixture of residential and nonresidential project components.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #4

In focus areas, incorporate multi-family development with commercial uses, community services and employment opportunities.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #5

Encourage commercial uses in the first floor of buildings in mixed-use corridors and focus areas, either as commercial establishments, mixed-use buildings, or as live-work units.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #6

Decrease minimum parking requirements and encourage shared or cooperative parking agreements in the focus areas for the Port San Antonio Area.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #7

For areas within the noise contours for the Lackland runway, incorporate sound attenuation standards into the Unified Development Code so that future residential development would be compatible with the mission and operations at Lackland Air Force Base.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Change the zoning of properties, where appropriate, to allow for multi-plex housing, townhouses, bungalow courts, and small-lot single-family houses as a transition between commercial areas and existing single-family neighborhoods.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Require more than one residential zoning district as base districts for any proposed new Master Planned Community Districts or Planned Unit Development Districts with a residential component in the plan area.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Evaluate whether designation as a historic landmark, historic district, or neighborhood conservation district would be appropriate for any portion of this plan area where conservation or cultural preservation is important.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #4

In areas designated as Urban Mixed-Use, ensure that density and intensity complement neighboring properties and do not have a negative impact on the stability of existing neighborhoods.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #5

Ensure that zoning for properties in the Port San Antonio Area supports the goals, d strategies of the housing plan component.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Rezone properties at key intersections along Loop 410 and US-90 to allow for greater development density.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Increases in density should be accompanied by augmented pedestrian spaces, walkable access to transit and shared parking. In these areas, land use and development density should be oriented toward transit riders and pedestrians at and near transit stations.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Housing

Strategy #1

Proactively market and explore expansion of homeowner assistance programs, such as the Minor Repairs Program and Homeownership Incentive Program, to residents to raise awareness and use of the programs.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Identify strategies and financial tools that can help mitigate impacts of increased property taxes from rising property values on lower-income homeowners or owners on fixed incomes.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Identify development sites to purchase for future affordable housing development that are in Focus Areas and along mixed-use corridors through the use of a community land trust, and/or through partnership with San Antonio Housing Authority and other non-profit housing partners.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Encourage higher-density housing and mixed-use development within the Focus Areas identified in the Regional Center Future Land Use Plan.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Expand and monitor the expansion of the Center City Housing Incentive Policy (CCHIP) to the Port San Antonio Area Regional Center to ensure the incentives are helping to catalyze the development of market-rate rental housing.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Provide examples and models for developers for how to build more compact, walkable residential neighborhoods that better integrate housing with nearby commercial, educational, and recreational amenities. Utilize the Place Types developed in the SA Tomorrow Comprehensive Plan, such as Green Neighborhood, Community Corridor, Neighborhood Main Street, Trail-Oriented Development, and Natural/Historic/Cultural Assets, to encourage new neighborhood designs and approaches.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Provide a process for residents to identify and help attract funding for desired neighborhood amenities. Support the addition of desired neighborhood amenities through various funding methods including capital improvement bond funds, federal housing and neighborhood funding sources, public-private partnerships, and other grants.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Economic Development

Strategy #1

Increase awareness of incentives and financing tools available through targeted outreach and various tactics to connect businesses with resources and information including the foreign Trade Zone Designation, City business attraction and expansion incentives, and the Opportunity Zone Designation.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Identify and facilitate the construction of any infrastructure improvements that support the vision of the Port San Antonio Innovation Center as a destination for eSports, science education, and innovation, and to attract businesses within target industries. Utilize the plan for infrastructure and amenities developed for the Regional Center to identify these high priority improvements.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Identify business support and workforce development programs and initiatives that can be integrated into Port San Antonio’s Innovation Center. A goal of the Innovation Center is to support early-stage entrepreneurs by providing co-working space and makerspace. Locate entrepreneurial support services and workforce programs at the Innovation Center or promote within to help enhance the appeal and success of the effort.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #4

Partner with the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation to reach out to property owners and businesses outside of the Port San Antonio Authority’s control to identify potential sites within the Regional Center that can support the growth of target industries. Help owners of commercial/industrial properties to leverage their proximity to Port San Antonio and Lackland Air Force Base (AFB) to attract additional employers to the Regional Center.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Create a mixed-use center around the planned eSports arena at the Innovation Center to provide attractions and opportunities for workers, businesses, residents, visitors to interact and cross paths through both formal and informal events and settings. The mixed-use center should be walkable, provide multimodal connections to other areas in Port San Antonio, and create inviting, safe, and comfortable amenities and public spaces that are active 18-hours a day.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Increase visitation to the Regional Center by expanding the range of services and amenities. Partner with Port San Antonio, Lackland AFB, and other businesses in the Regional Center to detail visitation and missing visitor amenities. Provide the real estate community, property owners, and businesses with information detailing the level of visitation to the Regional Center to help attract visitor-oriented businesses, such as hotels and restaurants.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #3

Promote and build awareness and use of eSports facilities at Port San Antonio’s Innovation Center, including providing local high schools and universities opportunities for access to the eSports facilities. Connect Port San Antonio to resources and promotional efforts to help Port San Antonio build the eSports component of the project.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #1

Develop a plan to integrate workforce development programs and resources within the Regional Center and expand awareness of programs to businesses, workers, and residents.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments

Strategy #2

Support education offerings and programs proposed for the Innovation Center in order to expand science education opportunities to area students through partnerships with the local independent school districts.
  • Regulation + Policy

  • Partnerships

  • Investments